Ridiculously redacted interpretation of FISA snooping law released – Naked Security

US privacy organization EFF invites you to click on thumbnails of the summaries it managed to pry out of the government, but let’s save your finger muscles the workout with this summaries summary: : ——————————.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation managed to pry a secret document out of the US government that describes how authorities should interpret the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) Amendments Act (FAA).

But a fat lot of good that does, given that a) they weren’t the actual documents the EFF requested and b) they were redacted into a ridiculously useless pile of dashes.

Source: Ridiculously redacted interpretation of FISA snooping law released – Naked Security

Experian Sold Consumer Data to ID Theft Service — Krebs on Security

An identity theft service that sold Social Security and drivers license numbers — as well as bank account and credit card data on millions of Americans — purchased much of its data from Experian, one of the three major credit bureaus, according to a lengthy investigation by KrebsOnSecurity.

Source: Experian Sold Consumer Data to ID Theft Service — Krebs on Security

Welcome to the world of tomorrow | Knowledge Brings Fear

This article is a bit old at this point, but the article is still coherent.

Strategically it all points to massive investments into internal security.

Presenting the problem to the population as a mutually exclusive choice between an uncertain dangerous freedom and an assured survival under the securing umbrella of the trustworthy state becomes more easy the further the various crises develop. The more wealthy parts of the population will certainly require protection from illegal immigrants, criminals, terrorists and implicitly also from the anger of less affluent citizens.

“Terrorism” is the theme of the day, others will follow. And these “themes” can and will be used to mold the western societies into something that has never been seen before: a democratically legitimated police state, ruled by an unaccountable elite with total surveillance, made efficient and largely unobtrusive by modern technology. With the enemy (immigrants, terrorists, climate catastrophe refugees, criminals, the poor, mad scientists, strange diseases) at the gates, the price that needs to be paid for “security” will look acceptable.

First principle of 21st century police state: All those who “have nothing to hide” should not be bothered unnecessarily.

With access to all the information outlined above, we will end up with a system of selective enforcement. It is impossible to live in a complex society without violating a rule here and there from time to time, often even without noticing it. If all these violations are documented and available for prosecution, the whole fabric of society changes dramatically.

Thinking about what can be done with the results of one’s work is one thing. Refusing to do the job because it could be to the worse of mankind is something completely different.

We will need to build technology to preserve the freedom of speech, the freedom of thought, the freedom of communication, there is no other long-term solution. Political barriers to total surveillance have a very limited half-life period. … Maintaining the political breathing spaces becomes more important than what this space is used for.

Often there is considerable freedom to design within the limits of our day jobs. We need to use this freedom to build systems in a way that they collect as little data as possible, use encryption and provide anonymity as much as possible. We need to create a culture around that.

We are facing an enemy that is euphemistically called “Global Observer” in research papers. This is meant literally. You can no longer rely on information or communication being “overlooked” or “hidden in the noise”. Everything is on file. Forever. And it can and will be used against you.

Source: Welcome to the world of tomorrow | Knowledge Brings Fear

How the U.S. Is Spreading ‘Procedures of Totalitarianism’ – The Atlantic

What gives us the right to spy on innocents anywhere abroad without any constraints?

[Eben] Moglen, a professor of law and legal history at Columbia, felt compelled to begin speaking on these subjects due in part to the radical position being taken by the U.S. and allied governments. As he put it, “We are being told that spying on entire societies is normal.”

It is no exaggeration to say that we’ve constructed sufficient infrastructure to gather and store more information on innocents than any government in history, totalitarian or otherwise.

Source: How the U.S. Is Spreading ‘Procedures of Totalitarianism’ – The Atlantic

Spain faces staggering losses as it accepts the reality of the housing bust — Quartz

Sales of repossessed properties were on average done at prices 71.5% lower than where the houses were originally valued. That means the average price for a house that was originally sold for €100,000 in say, 2006, repossessed and then sold during the first half of 2013, would have brought a price of €28,500.

Source: Spain faces staggering losses as it accepts the reality of the housing bust — Quartz