The World’s Most Efficient Languages – The Atlantic

How much do you really need to say to put a sentence together?

When a language seems especially telegraphic, usually another factor has come into play: Enough adults learned it at a certain stage in its history that, given the difficulty of learning a new language after childhood, it became a kind of stripped-down “schoolroom” version of itself.

only a few languages have been taken up as vehicles of empire and imposed on millions of unsuspecting and underqualified adults.

Source: The World’s Most Efficient Languages – The Atlantic

You can increase your intelligence: 5 ways to maximize your cognitive potential – Scientific American Blog Network

So—taking all of this into account, I have come up with five primary elements involved in increasing your fluid intelligence, or cognitive ability.

These five primary principles are:

  1. Seek Novelty
  2. Challenge Yourself
  3. Think Creatively
  4. Do Things The Hard Way
  5. Network

Source: You can increase your intelligence: 5 ways to maximize your cognitive potential – Scientific American Blog Network

Investing Returns on the S&P500

investing – Investing Returns on the Market as a Whole

Note that this stock market simulation assumes a portfolio that is invested in 100% US Stocks. While a lot of the results show that 100% Stocks can generate an impressive return, this is not an ideal portfolio.

In addition to this, this curve only looks at one lump sum of initial investing.

Source: investing/README.md at master · zonination/investing

The myth of millennial entitlement was created to hide their parents’ mistakes — Quartz

Browsing through news articles, two parallel worlds of millennials emerge. The first is inhabited by overtly political youth advocating for controversial initiatives like campus safe spaces. The second is filled with young consumers who are happy and prosperous yet prefer style over stuff–which, upon closer examination, is a euphemistic way of saying they cannot afford to buy much stuff anyway.

With all the confusion over and misrepresentations of younger generations, is it worth trying to define them at all? If recent events are any indication, the answer is yes—if defined correctly.

The inability of older generations to see how the economy has been fundamentally restructured since the Great Recession leads to short-sighted policies that young people, not boomers, will have to live with in the long run.

Source: The myth of millennial entitlement was created to hide their parents’ mistakes — Quartz

The Daredevil Camera

What struck me about the idea was that there was a way to focus sound. It was a piece of mesh of some sort, which acted as a lens for ultrasonics. … Imagine using such lenses to focus sound onto a plane of microphones. Just like light in a camera. One microphone is one pixel. An ability to see sound.

Source: The Daredevil Camera

Remarks at the SASE Panel On The Moral Economy of Tech

Approaching the world as a software problem is a category error that has led us into some terrible habits of mind.

We obsess over these fake problems while creating some real ones. In our attempt to feed the world to software, techies have built the greatest surveillance apparatus the world has ever seen. … Just like industrialized manufacturing changed the relationship between labor and capital, surveillance capitalism is changing the relationship between private citizens and the entities doing the tracking. Our old ideas about individual privacy and consent no longer hold in a world where personal data is harvested on an industrial scale.

We tend to imagine dystopian scenarios as one where a repressive government uses technology against its people. But what scares me in these scenarios is that each one would have broad social support, possibly majority support. Democratic societies sometimes adopt terrible policies.

The goal should be not to make the apparatus of surveillance politically accountable (though that is a great goal), but to dismantle it. Just like we don’t let countries build reactors that produce plutonium, no matter how sincere their promises not to misuse it, we should not allow people to create and indefinitely store databases of personal information. The risks are too high.

Source: Remarks at the SASE Panel On The Moral Economy of Tech

Brexit is what happens when our digital lives seem more “real” to us than our real ones — Quartz

In this case, people only started to believe in reality when they faced the consequences–the equivalent of deciding to study for an examine only after you’ve failed it.

Voters’ confusion about the consequences of their actions is indicative of a larger trend.

In some ways, our minds have become materially conditioned to mindless actions—things that can be deleted or edited or ignored.

Source: Brexit is what happens when our digital lives seem more “real” to us than our real ones — Quartz

The Rules for Abortion Are Still Rules—Not Loopholes

Texas’s H.B.2 statute imposed regulations that yielded no health benefit but made abortion a lot harder to get. The Supreme Court wasn’t fooled.

As Breyer noted, “When directly asked at oral argument whether Texas knew of a single instance in which the new requirement would have helped even one woman obtain better treatment, Texas admitted there was no such evidence in the record.”

Source: The Rules for Abortion Are Still Rules—Not Loopholes